A Script for Early Onset Festivity Frazzle

ScreamingHave you experienced in the past or are experiencing now any of the following symptoms?

  • Feelings of distress associated with the burdens of entertaining?
  • Mild annoyance to outright hostility at any little thing?
  • Yelling at drivers who take “your” parking spot?
  • Anticipating dread from the story Aunt So and So has told every holiday for the past 15 years?
  • Inability to button your trousers or skirt that inevitably follow a holiday meal?
  • Lethargy and bloating from 3 pieces of your favorite pie, two servings of stuffing, or sampling every hors d’ouevre prior to the main meal?
  • Desire to create an exit strategy before you even arrive?

If you are having some or all of these symptoms, I can assure you that you are not alone. This list is a sample of symptoms that one can experience during this time of year, but are not representative of the entire emotional gamut one can experience when diagnosed with Festivity Frazzle. 🙂 But it is going to be okay.

Just like we have prescriptions from doctors to cure what ails us physically, I have found the best script to get you and me through this holiday season with our love and joy still in tact. Curious?  Download my free guide Hacking the Holidays to combat this dreaded bug during the Holiday Season.

I also wanted to mention something I feel is important to share. When I was twenty-five, my dad disappeared from my life. It felt like that. It felt intentional, even though, he died in the garage of our family home from a cardiac arrest/stroke. It wasn’t as if he planned it, but somehow it felt that way.

There wasn’t a chance for me to say good-bye, or to even have a conversation about what he meant to me. There wasn’t a chance to say anything at all. I couldn’t ask him questions like: “What was your biggest challenge, and how did you overcome it?” “What did you love doing when you were my age?” “What did it mean to you when you become a dad?”

I didn’t get a chance to introduce him to my beautiful daughters either, nor did they get the chance to meet my larger-than-life dad. I could show them the movie, “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” but even that, while hitting all the right notes, still seems like a poor substitute. I wish I had thought about this enough to have prepared for the time when he wouldn’t be around. How I wish now that I had a videotape, a recording, something more real than faded photographs, and anecdotes from “back in the day.”

When I learned about StoryCorp I was so excited to see how technology could be used to ease suffering like mine. The app is really simple to use. You simply interview a family member, friend, etc… with your own questions, or with questions that they have already prepared for you. You decide how long you want the interview to be, record the interview, and when you are finished, the App saves the interview in your library. You can even upload the recording to the Library of Congress for future generations to learn about that special someone.

I wish this program existed 25 years ago before my dad had passed, because then I would have the answers to the questions that I hadn’t thought to ask when he was sitting right in front of me, all those years ago. My daughters would hear first-hand his love of life, his gentleness, and his kindness toward others; AND I could visit with my dad whenever I needed some Daddy Time. What a gift that would be!

On this Thanksgiving, maybe it is time for all of us to ask those questions that we have been wondering about before it is too late. If not for yourself, do it for those who will come after you. Just click  on the StoryCorp name above. Sharing some love is just a click away.

With love and gratitude.

Until next time,

Christinephoto(22)

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